Delay in Decisive Backup Camera Legislation Leads to Lawsuit

rearview camera

Rearview camera screen on a dashboard.
(This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons.)

At the end of September, a lawsuit was filed against the government by several citizen groups and individuals, citing government inaction on automotive rearview camera legislation.  While a law requiring rearview cameras in all motor vehicles was passed
in 2008 and slated for enactment in 2011
, the Transportation Department never delivered on it.

The Transportation Department said that it would add rearview cameras to its list of recommended safety measures just before the suit was filed.  Some automakers say that it is important that rearview cameras remain optional so that consumers can choose whether to pay extra for the feature.  However, NHTSA estimated in 2010 that backup cameras would add only $53 to $88 to the price of cars with dash display screens (which even many economy small cars now have) and $159 to $203 for vehicles without them.

Although this delay has frustrated and angered supporters of mandatory cameras, they have not completely lost the battle to bring the technology to the masses.  Now, there is global recognition of the significant benefits of the cameras.  This year, 79% of new cars offer the cameras either standard or as an option.  In addition, 53% of 2013 model cars and light trucks do have a standard camera.  Honda is leading the pack, making rearview vision standard on all models by 2014.

One of the individuals filing the lawsuit is Greg Gulbransen, who wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post to bring attention to his passion for the cause.  When he tragically hit his two year old, fatally, in 2002, he began to campaign for change. In 2007, the new law requiring backup cameras was named for his son Cameron.

“For many consumers backup cameras have reached the same status as air conditioning or cruise control,” says Karl Brauer, senior analyst at car research site Kelley Blue Book.  He notes that unlike those comfort features, “there’s a certifiable safety benefit to backup cameras. … It’s time for backup cameras to be a required feature on all new cars sold in the U.S.”